Cattle FAQs

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I am trying to get started with a 10 acre pasture first and then fence in more land as I grow. I have three other plots I can fence but my question is about the fencing. What would be best to use barbwire?, how many strands, how close do I set the posts. Appreciate any info I can get.





Answer posted by R Herrmann

This is how I do it. I use one fairly hefty hedge (Osage Orange) post and then 4 steel posts(the hedge wont let the fence tilt when they reach through). Posts are 15 ft. apart. I use 5 strands of barbed wire, the first strand about 15 inches from the ground. The second 8 inches above the first, the third 9 inches above the second, the fourth 9 inches above the third and the fifth 9 or 10 inches above the fourth. You can adjust spacing to suit your preferences. This makes a really nice fence that will hold any type cattle. For the corners I use a hedge post that takes two people to lift it. If one man can lift it, it is too small.





Answer posted by Janet

I'm just a beginner also, I have about 10 to 12 acres. I am fencing with metal posts and round wood post. I place them 15 feet apart and place a wood post every third post. I have five strands of barbed wire, with the middle strand hot. I placed the hot wire in the middle because I had trouble with the cows trying to eat the grass on the other side of the fence and a big Limo bull that liked to scratch up against the posts. They don't do either anymore. Hi David, I'm just a beginner also, I have about 10 to 12 acres. I am fencing with metal posts and round wood post. I place them 15 feet apart and place a wood post every third post. I have five strands of barbed wire, with the middle strand hot. I placed the hot wire in the middle because I had trouble with the cows trying to eat the grass on the other side of the fence and a big Limo bull that liked to scratch up against the posts. They don't do either anymore.





Answer posted by Dayna

We do about the same, except we only go about 10 feet between metal t-posts. We triple post the corners with big wooden poles (they look like 8 foot long telephone poles) and braced going each way. We use 5 strands on exterior fences and where we've cross fenced to keep them out of hay meadows we used 4 strands. The first strand goes pretty low, then to make it easy for the kids to help, we put the strands 5 "bumps" apart, that way they just counted the bumps on the t-post.





Answer posted by R Herrmann

I thought of a couple of more things. First, I made a piece of pipe with bolts welded on at the correct intervals for each barb wire. You just stand the pipe up and put the wires on the bolts and staple them. Second, this may sound stupid but I saw a neighbors fence last night and it reminded me. Put the wire on the side of the fence that the cattle will be pushing against. This way they push against the posts and not the staples.





Answer posted by TSR

David depending on how much future growth,etc. you're anticipating I believe I would give serious consideration to electric fence. It usually will be cheaper especially if you consider your labor. Cross fencing is easier just something to think about.





Answer posted by Frank K

We just finished this summer putting up @ 2500' of barb wire, and so did our neighbor. We did it different, and I have to say, ours is holding up better. His is already starting to show wear. Start with good end posts. here is what I welded to go on the ends: a triple pole, with 5' out of the ground, and 4 in the ground, the hole filled with premixed concrete. The end posts were 2 3/8 steel pipe, 12' long, with 3 poles going into the ground. There was anotyher 12' pipe about a foot off the ground. We used 5 strands of barb wire, and stretched it real good with a come along, (alot better than some "fence stretchers")